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{September 29, 2008}   Grandma’s Rolls
told you, not cute... but they are not long for this world so no one shall care or remember this...

told you, not cute... but they are not long for this world so no one shall care or remember this...

These are the rolls my grandma is always ask to make, and I am always asked for the recipe when I make them (which is much, much more rare I can assure you)… so when I posted them on the menu from the holiday/hurricane weekend, someone I have made them for before asked for the recipe… I thought I’d try to get a good picture of them (though it’s not that good) and I even made them in cloverleaf since that is how my grandmother does it… Her’s are infintely more cute than mine turned out, as yours probably will be if you make them, but I really am too impatient for yeast breads and it’s that impatience that you see… The title is not my claim, or hers, but rather the name they published them under in the 2 local cookbooks… While it has times, what we do rise them overnight, then shape them first thing before breakfast, let the rise again while we head off about the day (usually to church as this was often a Sunday staple at her house) and make them for lunchtime (bakes around 15-20 mins)…

Only make these for others if you think you can bear the clamour, otherwise you shall slave at this huge batch and be lucky to get 2 or 3 for yourself… They seem so humble and basic, they are the only non-store bought rolls I grew up on so I just assumed that was there charm…

But as a lady would bakes incessantly once enthusiastically asked me for the recipe I guess they could be different somehow, but they are and always have been the only homemade rolls I ever remember eating as everyone always used her recipe… and everyone always wants more of them so here, enjoy the much desired secret as I can assure you I won’t be easily cajoled into making them for anyone… I make them only once a year at either christmas or thanksgiving, the rest of the year I buy my bread… (And I usually eat them spread with jellied cranberry sauce instead of butter… and they are really good that way, one of my holiday favorites really…) I occassionally dip the balls in melted butter to shortcut having to grease the pans and the tops of the rolls (making the cloverleaf is painfully simple, put three balls of dough in the muffin cup) so it just gets recovered with a towel dampened with warm water and is ready for the oven… That is my only secret (and I didn’t do it this time, nor did I remember to butter the tops, but oh well), so go enjoy them if you’d like…

now this is not at all a necessary step, but I always flip them and let them cool upside down in the muffin pan... this lets the steam escape, no getting out the rack, and the tops rise out enough that you do not need to worry about them sinking back in the pan anyway... this is one of those helpful lazy times, you know the mother of invention type...

now this is not at all a necessary step, but I always flip them and let them cool upside down in the muffin pan... this lets the steam escape, no getting out the racks, and the tops rise out enough that you do not need to worry about them sinking back in the pan anyway... this is one of those helpful lazy times, you know the mother of invention type...

Best Rolls Ever(my g-ma, Tylertown’s “Cooking With Friends” 1998, p 94)**
1/2 c sugar
1/2 oil
2 eggs
1 tsp salt
1.25 c warm water
1 pkg dry yeast, dissolved in water
4 c all-purpose flour or 2 c white and 2 c whole-wheat flour

Mix sugar and oil. Add beaten eggs and salt. Dissolve yeast in water. Add to mixture. Then add flour until dough leaves the side of the pan. Let rise 4 hrs or overnight [with a wet towel over them–this is not a part of the printed version but a key part in how she taught me to do it so you don’t get a dried skin on top]. Roll out in desired shapes. Place on greased cookies sheet or muffin pans. Let rise 4 more hrs or until double in bulk. Bake at 350 until brown as desired. Makes 2.5-3 dozen rolls.

** This is of course in the Tylertown UMW’s “A Book of Favorite Recipes” as well—and probably any T-town cookbook since she started making them–but I don’t have the page number…

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